The Most Popular Home Improvements Among Seniors and Retirees

According to a 2012 AARP report, nearly 90% of people aged 65 and older wish to remain in their own homes as long as they are able. The report also showed that 80% of older Americans are committed to staying in place while they age. Finally, about 25% of the respondents plan to make modifications to their homes to make it easier for them to age in place. This information led us to investigate which home improvements and modifications are the most popular among seniors and retirees to make aging in place more comfortable and convenient for them. Some home improvements are much more costly than others, but they all make it easier for seniors and retirees to age in place.

Stair Lifts

One of the most popular home improvements for seniors and retirees is installing a stair lift. the stairs to upper floors often becomes difficult for older Americans, as they may develop muscle weakness and instability. Seniors also find it easier to carry laundry up and down the stairs when riding on a stair lift. Stair lifts carry a hefty price tag, but they are a less expensive option than installing elevators, which can cost as much as $30,000. Most stair lifts require custom-fit tracks for staircases, so it is a good idea to have them professionally installed.

Walk-In Bathtubs

Seniors and retirees may find it difficult to climb in and out of the bathtub. One of the more popular home improvements to solve this challenge is installing a walk-in bathtub. Over the years, walk-in tubs have become more convenient or luxurious, with some featuring quick drains and others featuring air massage systems with therapeutic jets. Another option is to install a walk-in shower and tub combination.

Bathroom Grab Bars and Safety Rails

There are a number of grab bars and safety rails available that can make the bathroom safer for seniors and retirees. Grab bars may be located on the bathtub and next to the toilet, and safety rails and safety frames may be installed on the commode to give seniors something to hold on to while transferring to and from the bathtub and toilet. Bathroom grab bars and safety rails are especially helpful for seniors who have trouble with balance or who are unsteady on their feet. Retirees who worry about slipping in the shower appreciate the added peace of mind that shower handles provide.

Lever-Style Door Handles

As seniors and retirees develop arthritis and lose some grip strength, they choose to replace their round doorknobs with lever-style door handles. Lever-style door handles do not require the same level of grip that traditional round doorknobs do, so they ease the level of difficulty seniors and retirees face when opening doors in their homes. Lever-style door handles are available for interior and exterior doors, and some feature unique push-pull mechanisms to make them even easier and more convenient for seniors.

Motorized or Automated Blinds

It can be difficult for seniors and retirees to operate blinds. An increasingly popular home improvement is installing motorized or automated blinds, complete with remote controls. These window treatments allow seniors and retirees to control their blinds without standing up, reaching across furniture, and reaching up high or bending low to make adjustments. Because of their custom nature, motorized or automated blinds should be measured and installed by a professional.

Many seniors and retirees invest in home improvements because they prefer to remain in their own homes and age in place as long as possible. While home improvements may seem costly at first, seniors and retirees soon realize that making some improvements to their homes for added safety, convenience, and comfort is well worth the investment.

About the Author

Angela Stringfellow is an author from Snappy Services. Snappy is an electrical, heating and air (HVAC), & plumbing services company in Georgia. You can learn more about the services offered by Snappy in some of their most popular areas by following the links below:

Kitchen Remodeling Ideas That Make Cooking and Dining Safe and Easy for Aging Adults

Aging adults intend to enjoy their retirement years, and for many of them that includes cooking and dining at home. Retirement allows seniors to have more time to spend on preparing healthy meals and entertaining family and friends, but as they grow older, safety and ease of food preparation can become a concern for seniors with mobility or cognitive difficulties, such as memory impairment from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

Because the kitchen often is the hub of family life, it is a room worthy of investment in modifications to keep it at the center of aging adults’ lives as well. There are several remodeling options that make cooking and dining safe and easy for aging adults, and we offer our top choices below.

First Floor Location

For older adults who struggle with mobility or who may develop mobility issues over time, the kitchen should be on the main level of the home. Food preparation is an activity that takes place several times a day, but it may be difficult for aging adults to climb the stairs so many times in one day. Moving the kitchen to the main level of the home is one of the best decisions aging adults can make for their homes, and it should be a top priority for any remodeling effort aimed at improving safety and access for older adults.


Consider the cabinets in the kitchen. If a senior has to over and reach to the back of the lower cabinets, we suggest adding pull-out shelves to reduce the strain associated with those movements. Pull-out shelves also tend to maximize the storage space in cabinets, so they also may enable the aging adult to store more items within easy access in the kitchen rather than in a separate pantry or closet.

As for upper cabinets, they may be mounted very high on the wall, making it difficult for seniors to reach items stored inside without making use of a stool or step ladder. If the homeowner does not want to go to the expense of hiring a contractor to lower the cabinet height, one option is to install pull-down shelves in the upper cabinets. These kitchen remodeling ideas may prevent falls and strains for the independent senior who may try to reach these high areas with the use of a stool, chair, or stepladder.

Cabinet and Drawer Knobs and Pulls

If the knobs and pulls on the kitchen cabinets and drawers are small, round knobs, consider replacing them with pulls and handles shaped like the letter “D” or those that are cup-shaped. Knobs and pulls with these distinct shapes are often easier for older adults to grip than traditional round knobs.


Of course, appliances play a crucial role in the kitchen. It is important that aging adults feel comfortable using their appliances safely. Additionally, ensure that the existing appliances are not faulty or pose a hazard. An older gas range may not be the best choice for an aging adult because older models lack an automatic pilot light, while updated gas ranges feature automatic pilot lights. Newer gas range models also have sealed burners, added safety. Moreover, newer appliances have several features that allow for ease of use, such as multiple timers, alarms, and large LED displays. They also are extremely energy efficient, which saves on utility bills — particularly helpful for seniors who are living on fixed incomes. Finally, some refrigerators offer handles designed for easy opening, which make them a perfect choice for aging adults.

Another appliance to consider for a kitchen remodel to make cooking and dining safe and easy for aging adults is a dishwasher. It may be difficult for aging adults to stand for long periods of time to wash dishes, so remodeling a kitchen to allow space for dishwasher installation is a smart idea. If the kitchen already has a dishwasher, consider relocating it so that it sits directly next to the sink for easier access. Another kitchen remodeling idea is to raise the height of the dishwasher, if possible, to reduce the chances of an aging adult straining to load and unload it. If these dishwasher options are too costly, one final suggestion is to consider purchasing a countertop dishwasher. These dishwashers fit between most countertops and cabinetry and are economical.

Aging adults who choose to remain in their own homes want to be as independent as possible, so remodeling the kitchen to make cooking and dining safe and easy for them should be a priority. From modifying cabinetry to updating appliances, there are several options for kitchen remodeling that allow seniors to make use of their kitchens and continue to enjoy cooking and dining experiences in their homes.

About the Author

Angela Stringfellow writes on behalf of Solvit Connecticut, an electrical, heating and air (HVAC), & plumbing services provider from CT. You can learn more about the services offered by Solvit in some of their most popular areas by following the links below:

The Best Bathroom Modifications for Senior Independence and Safety

Even the most independent seniors can struggle with bathroom safety. Slippery floors, tubs, and showers are dangerous for people of any age, and seniors especially need to be cautious when they are in the bathroom. One of the best ways to ensure senior independence and safety in the bathroom is to make modifications so that the bathroom is better suited to the seniors’ needs and abilities. Modifications actually promote senior independence and prevent accidents. We recommend a few of the most helpful modifications to improve accessibility and adaptability.

Preventing Slips in the Tub

Stepping in and out of the tub can be a daunting task for seniors. To make transitioning into the tub a little easier, consider installing a product that would help to prevent slips and falls. Rubber suction grip mats, adhesive strips, or an anti-slip surface material are three popular products for the bottom of the tub. Installing grab bars on the side of the tub or shower is one safety option for seniors who have mobility issues or who are at risk of slips and falls in the bathroom. Coupling grab bars with an anti-slip product can greatly reduce the risk of falls for your aging loved ones.

A bathtub or shower seat is another bathroom modification for seniors who have a difficult time standing for long periods of time or who have poor balance or general weakness. Most shower seats are constructed of durable plastic, while some include padded vinyl for extra comfort. Shower seats come in several options, including those with and without backs, those that are adjustable for height, and those that feature slip-resistant rubber feet. Heavy-duty shower seats also are available for seniors who need a seat that can accommodate more weight.

Adding Convenience to the Shower

If you’ve modified the shower with a shower seat or bench, another modification is to install a handheld shower for convenience. Handheld showers are within a senior’s reach, and they allow older adults to control the flow of water more easily than a traditional shower head, which generally is mounted near the top of the shower. Most handheld showers attach to an existing shower arm for easy installation, and others can be more permanently installed with a diverter valve. Handheld showers that are installed with diverter valves allow for other family members to use the traditional shower head. Another option is to install a shower head/handheld shower combination so that you do not have to incur the expense of installing a diverter valve.

Modifying the Toilet

If the bathroom has a standard toilet, the seat may be too low for seniors who have difficulty bending, sitting, or standing up from a low seat. Raised toilet seats are available as a modification to help seniors be more independent and safe in the bathroom. Raised toilets are available for both standard round toilets and elongated toilets. Many include handles to aid seniors in standing and sitting to prevent sliding, slips, and falls.

Medline Toilet Safety RailsSome seniors do not require raised seats, but do require toilet safety rails or grab bars for added security and stability when sitting down on or standing up from the commode. Most toilet safety rails easily attach to the toilet, and some are adjustable for height and width. Seniors have more confidence when transferring to and from the toilet when they can hold on to and push down on a toilet safety rail.

Preventing accidents for seniors in the bathroom is not as difficult as it may seem, if you make a few simple modifications to meet their needs. Consider their weaknesses and the bathroom areas that pose problems for them, and then make modifications to prevent serious accidents. You’ll likely increase their confidence and sense of security at the same time.




About the Author

Angela Stringfellow is an author from Snappy Services, an electrical, heating and air (HVAC), & plumbing services provider based out of Marietta, Georgia. You can learn more about the services offered by Snappy in some of their most popular areas by following the links below:

5 Must-Have Home Modifications for Seniors Aging in Place

As reported by AARP, 80% of seniors have a firm plan to age in place. There are some home modifications that should be completed to make aging in place more possible for older adults, though. These modifications are a proactive approach to increasing the level of safety in the home, and they often add convenience and comfort for seniors as well. While there are sometimes high costs associated with modifying homes to enable seniors to age in place, many older adults are happy to incur these expenses to fulfill their wish to remain in their own homes.

Widen Doorways

If a senior relies on mobility aids, such as a walker or wheelchair, to navigate through her home, widening doorways is a must-have home modification. Depending on the insulation and placement of electrical switches and outlets in the home, costs vary greatly for widening doorways.

Install Ramps

Exterior stairs may be a challenge for seniors who are unsteady on stairs or who have balance issues, so installing ramps is a necessary home modification that is well worth the cost to provide greater independence. contractors are trained in building and installing ramps of the correct height and rise for seniors.

Indoor threshold ramps are also necessary home modifications for older adults who use wheelchairs. These indoor ramps provide smooth transitions from one surface to another, making it safer to navigate throughout the home. The threshold ramps often are constructed of rubber, so they’re easily adjustable to accommodate the step or door jamb height that is involved in the transition.

Kitchen Modifications

As seniors age, they may find that their appliances are no longer in ideal locations and that their countertops and cabinetry are too high, especially if they are in a wheelchair. Professional contractors may need to come in and adjust the counter height and lower the sink, to allow for easier access from a seated position. Additionally, seniors aging in place often find it easier when microwaves are placed in microwave stands, as opposed to being at the back of the counter or in raised microwave cabinets.

Shower and Bathtub Modifications

A senior opting to age in place also should consider home modifications for the bathroom, particularly the bathtub. One option is to replace the bathtub with a walk-in shower, which provides much easier (and safer) entry and exit than a bathtub. A second bathroom modification option is to replace a traditional bathtub with a walk-in tub.

If a senior wants to keep his existing bathtub, or cannot afford to replace it, there are less expensive modifications that can be made to prevent slips and falls in the bathtub. One modification is to add a safety bar to the tub, while another is to install safety strips. Both of these simple modifications can help prevent slips and falls in the bathtub.

Yet another modification for the bathtub, which is less expensive than replacing the or shower, is to purchase a bathtub transfer bench. Transfer benches straddle the side of the bathtub, enabling seniors to sit safely on the bench while getting into the tub by lifting each leg, one at a time, over the bathtub wall. Getting into the tub while seated greatly reduces the risk of dangerous slips and falls for seniors. Some seniors who cannot spare the required bathroom floor space for bathtub transfer bench legs opt for bathtub chairs, which sit completely inside the bathtub. Seniors may be able to turn around and sit on the chair with both legs outside of the tub and then lift one leg at a time over the tub wall while seated.

Flooring Modifications

Flooring is another consideration for older adults making home modifications with the goal of aging in place. The first step is to evaluate the home’s existing floors. If the carpet is older and shaggy, you may want to consider replacing it with new carpeting that has a shorter nap. Seniors are less likely to trip on shorter-nap carpeting, and it’s also more suitable for seniors who navigate through the home with the use of a walker or wheelchair.

Hardwood, tile, laminate, and vinyl floors are smooth and may allow for easier wheelchair maneuvering, but they also tend to be more slippery than carpeting. People often use throw rugs on these types of flooring, so be sure that you either get rid of them or securely tape them down to prevent trips and falls.

The best course of action to take when making home modifications for seniors aging in place is to consider all of the areas of the home that present the most trouble or concern. If there are things that are especially difficult for seniors, like reaching the countertops or light switches, modify them. If there are potential tripping or falling hazards, eliminate them or modify them accordingly. Taking a proactive approach to modifying the home means that seniors can age in place independently while their loved ones have peace of mind knowing that their aging loved ones are safer in their homes.

About the Author

This post was a contribution from Angela Stringfellow, who writes on behalf of Solvit Home Services, an electrical, heating and air (HVAC), & plumbing services provider from Connecticut. You can learn more about the services offered by Solvit in some of their most popular areas by following the links below:

Subsidized Senior Housing – 5 Tips for Securing Safe, Affordable Subsidized Senior Housing in a Down Economy

Securing safe and affordable subsidized senior housing can feel daunting. Here are five subsidized senior housing tips to help you find the right match:

1. Plan In Advance Of Senior Housing Needs

The most important tip for seniors looking for affordable subsidized senior housing is to plan in advance of your housing needs. Current homeowners who are downsizing to senior housing need to consolidate their current possessions so moving costs are reasonable. Plans should be made up to two years in advance of relocation to safe and affordable subsidized senior housing if possible. Determine the actual size of the new housing that’s needed. Then, scale back on furnishings to compensate any losses of space.

2. Be Prepared To Research Senior Housing Information

In a down economy, it’s necessary to spend adequate amount of time researching information regarding senior housing in order to find the most financially appropriate fit. This might include government-assisted housing programs as well as local or state information databanks where available. This is a very important facet of securing safe and affordable subsidized senior housing. Research will also help avoid possible financial losses. Rather than wade through volumes of paperwork, transfer all information gathered to a spreadsheet for easier comparisons and viewing. Make certain that all information is understood before making final decisions.

3. Assess and Evaluate Location and Housing Expenses

Once information about subsidized senior housing is gathered, the next step is to assess and evaluate each location and any additional expenses. For instance, determine whether utilities are included or this is an additional expense. If it’s an additional expense, check with utility companies for senior discounts that may be available. Location is important for other reasons such as proximity to hospitals, doctors, family and shopping. Another issue is transportation. Some subsidized senior housing offers senior transportation on a regular basis while others do not. Parking facilities for family, visitors and personal vehicles is another issue that may be of concern. For some seniors, even the availability of a central shared laundry room may be important. Other significant factors of importance are safe and secure facilities. Review the location carefully before making a decision.

4. Determine Financial Resources

Fortunately, seniors today can take advantage of assistance to determine their financial resources. This should be done before researching information on housing availability. The reason is that most subsidized senior housing is based upon ability to pay rent or leasing. Thus, having a thorough and complete knowledge of personal financial resources will clear away any questions that may arise. There’s another reason to review financial resources. This is the best way to determine affordability as well as maintaining vigilance over future income and cash outlays for unexpected expenses.

5. Adjusting To Lifestyle Changes

Moving out of one’s home or relocating is always an emotional upheaval at any age. For seniors, it may be especially difficult. It needn’t be if a little bit of forethought is applied to the situation. Securing safe and affordable subsidized senior housing should be viewed as a new life phase. For some seniors, familiar surroundings can be debilitating mentally and physically. Subsidized senior housing has many advantages that are designed for safety and affordability. Some offer meals and laundry services as well as recreational activities.

With subsidized senior housing options available ranging from unfurnished one bedroom apartments to assisted living facilities and nursing homes, there are many factors to consider in making the transition to subsidized senior housing as smooth and beneficial to elderly tenants as possible.

The Three Best Ways to Find Income Based Apartments for Seniors

Finding affordable housing for seniors can often be a difficult task, especially when financial resources are extremely limited. One possible avenue is to check into income based apartments for seniors that consider tenants’ income when determining the amount of the monthly rent. There are three potential resources that can provide help in locating available income based apartments for seniors, even if the focus is finding something in a small or mid-sized city.


Local Non-Profit Organizations

One potential source for leads on income based apartments for seniors is any local organization focused on providing support services to citizens who have reached retirement age. Local councils on aging as well as watchdog agencies who specialize in protecting the rights of seniors often maintain listings of housing that will likely be in line with the senior’s income level, and provide discounts based on that level of income. These organizations may operate on a citywide level, although it is not unusual for them to cover an area as large as a country or parish. Best of all, these lists are often qualified, meaning that the organization has taken steps to verify that the apartments do meet basic standards.

City and County Agencies

Along with non-profit organizations, agencies that are directly operated by the local jurisdiction are also likely to have a list of income based housing options for seniors. Obtaining the listings usually requires making a formal request and may require meeting certain criteria in terms of income levels and any special health needs. Those qualifications help the agencies to narrow the selection to income based apartments for seniors that are equipped with ramps or other amenities that would allow senior tenants to enjoy a measure of independence.

State Resources

In many states, income based apartments for seniors may be managed under the auspices of a state department of housing or similar agency. Apartment complexes of this type may be directly owned and operated by the state, or be the property of a business that has agreed to provide housing for seniors based on income levels. The complexes may be new construction or include hospitals and other facilities that have been remodeled to create viable housing options.

Formal applications are usually required in order to be considered for one of these income based apartments for seniors, with the owner conducting background checks and taking all the precautions that apply to any prospective tenant. Along with basic financial and other information, there is a good chance that the application will also include the opportunity to provide data on any special health needs that the prospective tenant may have, such as the need for wheelchair friendly facilities with wider doors and lower cabinet tops. If the goal is to secure income based housing in an assisted care apartment complex, that request should also be provided to the agency in advance. Depending on the degree of demand in the area, it may be necessary to be placed on a waiting list until a unit becomes available.

The goal is to find the right housing situation for the senior tenant. Doing so will mean spending some time and effort in visiting and qualifying possible options based on factors as the proximity to loved ones, general conditions of the neighborhood, and the specific health needs of the loved one. By making it a point to make use of every available resource to find the right type of housing at the right price, the chances of finding an income based apartment that the senior will enjoy are greatly enhanced.

Announcing the Senior Housing Guide and Senior Housing Trends Infographic

For many seniors and their family members, the choices for senior citizen housing can be overwhelming. From aging in place with the assistance of caregivers in independent living communities or senior assisted living facilities, to more extensive care giving options for seniors with higher levels of acuity like memory care centers and skilled nursing facilities, there are a range of options and its difficult to know which solution is right for you or your family member.

With that in mind, we’ve put together our new Senior Housing Guide, which is a comprehensive resource on all the senior housing options available and will provide you with the information you need to make an educated decision on the right senior living option for your loved one.

To see the guide, go to Senior Housing Guide

We’ve also embedded an infographic in the guide that illustrates the current trends in senior housing, including what they are and how they’re changing the face of senior citizen housing.

Here’s a sneak preview of the infographic.

trends in senior citizen housing infographic

To see the entire infographic and share it with others, go to Senior Housing Trends Infographic


Choosing the Best Senior Care Center: 10 Questions to Ask

Making the decision to transition from your home to an assisted living facility can be difficult. There will surely be questions and concerns when trying to decide on the right senior care facilities for you. Knowledge is power! Figuring out the right questions to ask when visiting your potential new home can help you make the best choice. You will want the move into a senior care center to be as easy and stress free as possible for you and your family.

What are the standard assisted living services provided?

Find out exactly what living at a senior care center will consist of. Things like housekeeping and laundry services are typically available, as well as access to health and medical services. Inquire as to what a typical staff member is available to help with if needed and what senior care service can be provided if asked for.

Does this senior care facility feel comfortable?

Does the center feel homey and warm? Are you able to personalize your own space? Look around at other residents of the home, do they seem happy and comfortable? Observe if the staff seems friendly and accommodating.

Is the facility in compliance with state regulations and licenses?

Ask if everything is up to code and if there has been a recent inspection. It would also be helpful to check with the Better Business Bureau for complaints that have been filed, if any.

What’s the cost?

Find out all living costs for the billing cycle. It would also be a good idea to know how and when the facility bills. Check to see if insurance is accepted and if so, make the necessary calls to the insurance company.

Are there additional costs for extra activities or outings?

You will want to know if, besides the monthly cost, there will be any additional costs for extra activities. Knowing this up-front will prevent problems and surprise costs when the monthly bill comes in.

Are hobbies and activities that you are interested in offered?

Keeping the mind active is always a benefit. Finding an assisted living facility with activities, hobbies and groups that you enjoy will make your new home enjoyable and comfortable, all while making new friends.

How’s the food?

It may seem like an afterthought, but the menu will part of your everyday life. Find out the quality and variety of the menu. Will there be alternatives to the scheduled meals and will all dietary restrictions be accommodated?

Can you make calls, have visitors, and go on outings?

Find out what the rules for phone calls and visitations are. Knowing which facility’s rules best accommodate you will make choosing a new home much easier. Also inquire about outings with family and what the rules are regarding those.

How are non-emergency medical concerns addressed?

You will want to know how concerns, such as medications and check-ups, are addressed. Ask how medications are given out daily. Find out if you will continue to see your current physician or if there is a physician on staff who will take over your routine appointments.

What are the procedures for an emergency?

Should an emergency arise, the last thing you or your family would want to wonder is what happens now? Go over what the emergency procedures are when you speak with a representative from the facility. Ask questions about the standard procedures regarding fires and also medical emergencies. You will want to make sure family will be contacted immediately should there be an emergency.

Life in an assisted living facility is an undeniable adjustment. This can feel stressful in the beginning. But asking the right questions will hopefully calm your fears and anxiety and make the transition much easier.

For Information on Assisted Living and Care Homes:

5 Key Benefits of Assisted vs. Unassisted Senior Home Living

Continued growth in the elderly population, and the chronic diseases strongly associated with aging, is an inevitable byproduct of modern healthcare systems. The conventional choice for long-term care of the elderly, especially those experiencing a loss of self-efficacy due to disease, has been the nursing home. These facilities carry a lot of stigma though, both for their elderly clients and the family, as well as seemingly regular reports of abuse and neglect.

Fortunately, there is an alternative for senior citizen care. Both designated communities and assisted care options exist, and both offer a number of benefits over the nursing home. The singular quality they share is in allowing the person to continue living as independently and privately as their abilities and health status allow.


  1. Assisted Living Homes Increase Quality of Life
    Minimizing intervention is an important factor to increasing self-efficacy and quality of life for elderly citizens. An individual may still be able to perform most daily chores, and assisted living specialists recognize this. Instead of relinquishing their homes, possessions, privacy, and independence, assisted care only picks up those chores that can no longer be handled safely or appropriately. This could be as simple as reminders of what medications to take or providing transportation to the doctor’s office and other routine stops.


  1. A Senior Living Community Provides Social and Recreational Opportunities
    One of the sad facts of growing older is losing the contacts built over a lifetime. Old friends pass away or move and this can lead to a more secluded lifestyle. It is a well-known fact that having a socially rich life is an important part of promoting good health and positive emotions.


Assisted living communities provide public spaces for meeting others with similar interests. There are also organizers on duty to help with arranging events and outings that can be enjoyed by everyone. Whether it is tea time, a game of chess in the park, or a trip to the ballot box in November, life takes on more meaning when shared with others.


  1. An Assisted Living Residence is Designed to Minimize Hazards
    Specialists in elderly care are trained to pay attention to the environment. Just as the parents of a newborn have to take precautions to ensure their child’s safety, so too must modifications be made to minimize the hazards faced by the elderly. Adding important appliances, like shower grab bars, remote panic buttons, and many others most of us rarely consider, can make it much easier for an elderly person to continue living independently, while minimizing the need for outside interventions.


  1. Senior Home Living Means Rapid Response to Emergency Situations
    Even with modifications, accidents happen. Having access to trained personnel at all times can mean the difference between a small fracture and a life-threatening event. As well, intermittent visits to a doctor or with family can be inadequate for spotting a gradually developing health issue. In a community setting, problems can be noticed and addressed more quickly. In any case, fast response translates into a better chance of overcoming difficulties.


  1. Senior Living Homes are Adaptable to the Individual’s Needs
    Perhaps the signature quality of assisted care, which makes it a better choice than a nursing home, is in its adaptability to the individual’s needs. An elderly person with less mobility requires a different set of support than someone who is having trouble remembering details, like how much salt to use in a recipe, or when they last watered the garden. Instead of losing all independence and privacy, senior living homes make it possible to provide just the support needed for each person.

For Information on Nursing Homes and Assisted Living:

Nursing Home Closures: The Elderly Population is Exploding, Yet Nursing Homes are Closing

Today, we’ve launched our first infographic at Assisted Living Today. It’s a visually compelling graphic that covers the rash of nursing home closures that have been occurring since 2008 across the United States. Even in the face of a ballooning Boomer and elderly population, nursing homes are closing, and minority areas are feeling the brunt of it. If you’d like share this infographic with others, use the social sharing icons on the left. You can also embed it by clicking on the link below and grabbing the HTML code.

See the Nursing Home Closures Infographic Here

Nursing Home Closures Infographic

For Information on Nursing Homes and Assisted Living: